Volume 7, Issue 1 (Spring/Summer 2002)

The UCLA Journal of International Law and Foreign Affairs (JILFA) begins its seventh year of publication by continuing to publish a range of articles that reflect the diversity of the fields of international law and inter- national relations. In this issue, we include two articles that complement each other by exploring human rights policies at both the national and international levels. Available online at HeinOnline, Westlaw, or LexisNexis.

Who Protects the Stranger? The French Dual Court System Confronts the Politics of Immigration: A Critique of the Tribunal des Conflits’ Decision of May 12, 1997, by Farhad Ghaussy. 7 UCLA J. Int’l L. & Foreign Aff. 1.

In Who Protects the Stranger? The French Dual Court System Con- fronts the Politics of Immigration: A Critique of the Tribunal des Conflits’ Decision of May 12, 1997, Farhad Ghaussy uses a controversial French judicial decision limiting judicial power to protect civil liberties as a launching point for discussing the judicial independence issues raised by the case. Ultimately, the article is an illuminating study that raises important questions for all democracies that are grappling with the problem of preserving human rights protections in the face of increased political sentiment opposed to immigration.

Closing the Gap Between Legitimacy and Legality of Humanitarian Intervention: Lessons from East Timor and Kosovo, by Tania Voon. 7 UCLA J. Int’l L. & Foreign Aff. 31.

Tania Voon’s article Closing the Gap Between Legitimacy and Legality of Humanitarian Intervention: Lessons from East Timor and Kosovo uncovers and explores the gap between legitimacy and legality in humanitarian interventions. By exploring in turn the Australian and U.N. intervention in East Timor and the NATO intervention in Kosovo, she helps to bring into focus the relative importance of various factors towards determining the legitimacy of any intervention. She also evaluates the outcomes of the interventions in light of their stated goals, and exposes the difficulties in crafting a sustainable legal framework that reflects these factors.

COMMENT: Confronting State Complicity in International Law, by Kate Nahapetian. 7 UCLA J. Int’l L. & Foreign Aff. 99.

Kate Nahapetian, a graduate of Boalt Hall School of Law at UC Berkeley, in Confronting State Complicity in International Law, deals with the troubling issue of states that contribute indirectly to human rights viola- tions.

COMMENT: Pursuing an End to Foreign Child Labor Through U.S. Trade Law: WTO Challenges and Doctrinal Solutions, by Benjamin James Stevenson. 7 UCLA J. Int’l L. & Foreign Aff. 129.

Benjamin James Stevenson of the Florida State University College of Law, discusses the legality and effectiveness of unilateral approaches to dealing with the problem of child labor in Pursuing an End to Foreign Child Labor Through U.S. Trade Law: WTO Challenges and Doctrinal Solutions.

COMMENT: Terrorism as a Crime Against Humanity and Genocide: The Backdoor to Universal Jurisdiction, by James D. Fry. 7 UCLA J. Int’l L. & Foreign Aff. 169.

James D. Fry, of the Georgetown University Law Center, in Terrorism as a Crime Against Humanity and Genocide: The Backdoor to Universal Jurisdiction, argues that in appropriate circumstances the classification of terrorism as a crime against humanity or as genocide can be used to offer states a powerful enforcement tool.

Available online at HeinOnline, Westlaw, or LexisNexis.

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